Faith Blog

A HEALTHY FAITH WALK

Today's OT reading brings us to the end of Job. There are two things to point out in this passage that are vital to maintaining a healthy faith walk as Christians:

 

(1) Did you notice that Job never gets the answer to "why" that he was searching for? Instead, he is asked a series of leading questions pointing to "who" God is: the Creator of all things (38:4-11) who continues to work through creation (38:12-38) with an immense concern for life (38:39-39:30), justice (40:8-14), and the power to control the powerful (40:15-41:34). I think this is important to remember when we go through trials that don't seem to make sense. Like Job, we can admit that we don't know everything -- and trust in God's character -- when our life goes off the rails.

 

(2) God's response to Job's "friends" is also interesting. They've said some very hurtful things to Job, and misrepresented God's intent in this ordeal (42:7). But God doesn't zap them, nor does he ignore the hurt that they've caused (which would have probably meant Job severing his relationship with them). No, the healthy walk of faith being modeled here involves reconciliation and restoration of their relationships. THIS is when Job receives his blessings from God (42:9-10). And that's a great lesson for us to learn as well.

 

 

Posted by Erik Brommers with

ARE YOU A SORRY COMFORTER?

Have you ever been misunderstood?  Worse yet, has your suffering or struggle ever been misinterpreted?  We all have a propensity to want to make pronouncements on the sufferings or struggles of others. We, too often, behave as if we have a lock on the direction for and discipline of others.  We behave as if the Lord has privately provided us His plan for those in our life who are suffering.  But we have to be cautious....

Job related the following in today's reading, "Sorry comforters are you all! Is there no limit to your windy words?...I too could speak like you, if I were in your place!...I do not find a wise man among you!...How long will you torment me and crush me with words?"  Job's 'friends' self-righteously believed they knew what motivated God in bringing Job's sufferings.  And they were all too ready to share that with Job!

We are to be compassionate friends as we help those we love walk through their suffering.  Compassion is defined as 'sympathetic consciousness of others' distress together with a desire to alleviate it.' A good friend does not stand self-righteously aloof but works to mitigate the suffering with both words and action.  Jesus, our example, did just that for us as He 'bore our griefs, was pierced for our transgressions, was crushed for our iniquity, and justified the many'!  Praise be to God!

Posted by Curt Krohn with

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